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Old Christ Church Waterloo Road Waterloo L22 1RE

ABOUT THE CHURCH

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ABOUT THE CHURCH
ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION OF THE CHURCH
"The Friends of Old Christ Church"

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Christ Church was built in 1891-99 to replace a much humbler building by something more in keeping with the increasing prosperity of this rapidly growing suburb of Liverpool. 
Its majestic tower of pink sandstone became a landmark for sailors, and still dominates the neighbourhood. The church was disused for many years, and World War II bombing and later vandalism wreaked some damage, but the architecture is hauntingly romantic.
It is a huge and impressive building with wonderful stained glass and a strong sense of Victorian confidence and civic pride. 

The fittings and furnishings have gone but the interior remains striking. Soaring timber vaults form the roofs and graceful arches lead your eye to the great east window. Here, in vibrantly colourful stained glass, are depicted Christ with angels, saints and Old Testament figures. The west window is similarly gorgeous, and depicts the twelve Apostles. The glass is by Shrigley and Hunt, among the leading manufacturers of their period. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrigley_and_Hunt

The present church was built in 1891-99 to designs by Austin & Paley of Preston and replaced the earlier church built in 1840. The firm was the leading architectural practice in the north-west and, at the time the church was built, it was at the height of its prolific and creative output, specialising in fine churches. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_works_by_Paley,_Austin_and_Paley

By about 1980 the congregation had dwindled and in 1982 the church was declared 
redundant and fell into disrepair. In 1993 the church was in a very sorry state so a demolition scheme was published. As a result of objections a non-statutory public inquiry was held and resulted in the church being vested in the Churches Conservation Trust. 
With the help of grants the roofs were repaired, dry rot was dealt with and later the windows and the interior were repaired. 

The church is built in Bootle sandstone with roofs of Westmorland slate. The style is typical of the architects' town churches of the period, being a freely-treated Perpendicular but with innovative elements including details that can almost be described as Art Nouveau.